It’s not difficult at all! How to count scores, even for golf beginners

golfScoreCounterDotcom_It's not difficult at all! How to count scores, even for golf beginners 未分類
golfScoreCounterDotcom_It's not difficult at all! How to count scores, even for golf beginners

When you go to a golf course, it is very important to learn how to count your score as well as good manners.

“All I have to do is count the number of shots I hit, right? “I’m a beginner, so I’m allowed to make mistakes, right? There are many people who have had the bitter experience of being disliked because they got their scores wrong, even though they didn’t do it on purpose.

Many of those who have had such experiences say that they initially thought the rules were too difficult and used the fact that they were beginners as an excuse, saying, “I’ll just learn the rules when I go to the course.

However, when it comes to counting scores, it is not just a matter of counting the number of shots you hit, and although it is often misunderstood as “difficult,” it is very easy to learn.

In this article, I’ll introduce you to some rules and situations where you can easily learn how to count scores, which may seem difficult!

First of all, let’s learn the basics of how to count golf scores so that the people you play a round with will want to play with you again, and make your future golf life even better!

When you go to a golf course, it is very important to learn how to count scores in addition to good manners.

“Why don’t I just count how many shots I hit? If you’re a beginner, you’re allowed to make mistakes. There are many people who have had the bitter experience of being disliked because they got their scores wrong, even though they didn’t do it on purpose.

Many of those who have had such experiences say that they initially thought the rules were too difficult and used the fact that they were beginners as an excuse, saying, “I’ll just learn the rules when I go to the course.

In this article, I’ll introduce you to some rules and situations where you can easily learn how to count scores, which may seem difficult!

First of all, let’s learn the basics of how to count golf scores so that the people you play a round with will want to play with you again, and make your golf life even better!

Rules for counting: The number of clubs swung plus the number of penalties combined is the score.

Golf is a sport in which players compete to get around the course with the lowest score possible.

You basically count your own score, and the people around you also check your score. The golf course is basically played by four players, so you have to count your own score plus the scores of three others.

If you are a beginner, you may think that the number of times the ball moves is your score, but that is not true! The correct score is the sum of “the number of times you swung the club other than bare-handed” and “the number of hits you have to add for penalties.

The score is the sum of the number of times you swung the club other than bare-handed and the number of hits that must be added as a penalty.

The score is calculated for each hole, and then the total number of holes is calculated at the end. The ideal score for 18 holes is a total of 72, but this is not possible for beginners. If you are still new to the game, try your best to play with a score of 120.

Calling: If you’re a beginner, there are only seven callings you need to remember!

A golf score is not only a number, but also has a name that is determined by how many shots less or more than the standard number of shots set for each hole.

The standard number of strokes for each hole consists of three patterns [5, 4, and 3], and the overall standard number of strokes for the course is set to be 72. (The standard number of strokes for the entire course may differ from course to course.

(The standard number of shots for the entire course may vary from course to course.) It is fine if you just want to tell the score by the number, but if you go around with people who are used to playing golf, it is often better to remember some of the special names to carry on a conversation.

There are seven names to remember. Here are the names of each and how many shots less or more than the specified number of shots are needed.

Par

A score that is the same as the number of shots required for the hole (+/- 0).

Example: If you hit 4 times on a hole with a regulation number of 4 shots (par 4)

Double Par

A score that is twice the number of shots required for the hole (number of shots required x 2)

Example: If the number of times you hit the ball on a hole with a regulation of 4 shots (par 4) is 8 times

Birdie

A score that is one stroke less than the number of shots required for that hole (-1)

e.g.: If the number of times you hit the hole with the specified number of shots is 4 (par 4), and the number of times you hit the hole is 3

Eagle

A score that is two shots less than the number of shots required for the hole (-2)

e.g.: 3 times on a hole with 5 shots (par 5)

Bogey

A score that is one stroke higher than the number of shots required for the hole (+1)

Example: If the number of times you hit the hole with the regulation of 4 shots (par 4) is 5 times

Double bogey

Two more than the number of shots required for the hole (+2)

Example: If the number of times you hit the hole with the regulation number of 4 shots (par 4) is 6 times

Triple bogey

A score that is 3 shots more than the stipulated number of shots for that hole (+3)

Example: If the number of times you hit the hole with the regulation number of 4 shots (par 4) is 7 times

Seven of the following. Other terms include albatross (-3) and hole-in-one (hitting the ball on the first shot), but you don’t have many chances to use them, so just keep them in mind.

How to calculate troubles and penalties

Next, I’ll show you how to count the penalties that are added to the number of shots you actually hit, as mentioned in the counting rules!

In fact, counting penalties is easy, but it tends to get complicated and confusing sometimes, even for advanced players.

In this article, I’ll show you how to count penalties and examples of how to count penalties in different situations so that it is easy to remember and less confusing.

When you hit an OB (OB)

When you hit the ball into the water

When the ball has moved

When you strike out

When you lose your ball

I’ll introduce you to these five situations!

OB (OB): When you hit the ball again, you need to add one more stroke

First, let’s talk about OB, a term you may have heard before.

OB means outside the playable area. It is an area that the golf course has set aside because it is overgrown with trees and grass, so you can’t swing the club properly and hit the ball. A white stake or white line is the boundary line between the area and OB.

When you hit the ball into OB, you basically have to hit the ball again from the original position.

If you are not sure whether you have hit the ball into OB or not, you can hit a spare ball called a “provisional ball” and proceed with play.

If you hit the provisional ball and it did not go to OB, you can pick up the provisional ball and hit the original ball without penalty and start playing.

Here are two examples of how to count OB.

When the tee shot is OB

→If your first shot goes OB, you will be penalized one stroke. If you hit OB on the first tee shot, you will be penalized one stroke, so you will have to hit again on the third tee shot.

When the second shot is OB

→If your second shot is OB, you will have to hit the ball again from the fourth shot.

There are many people who get confused, but remember that OB is basically the number of shots you hit plus one, so [the original number of shots + the number of OBs x 2 = your score].

Pond hitting: 1 additional stroke penalty

When you hit a ball into a pond, it means that you hit into an area called a water hazard.

Water hazards include not only ponds, but also rivers and drainage channels in the middle of the hole.

If you hit a ball into a water hazard, you can hit it without a penalty, but it will make your score worse, so it is better to pay the penalty.

The difference between OB and OB is that hitting the ball again is not the only way to deal with it.

If you hit your third ball into the water, the next ball you hit will be your fifth ball, so keep that in mind.

Ball movement: penalties vary depending on whether it was natural or intentional

If the ball moves, the penalty will depend on whether it was natural or intentional.

If the ball was moved by wind or earthquake, there is no penalty and you can hit the ball from where it was moved.

Also, if the ball is hit by another competitor’s ball or by a living creature, there is no penalty, but you can return the ball to its original place.

If the ball is inadvertently moved during the second shot, you will have to hit it again for the fourth shot.

Striking out: Not a penalty, but counts as one stroke

There is no penalty for striking out.

There is no penalty for striking out, but it is counted as one stroke because the player struck out with the intention of hitting the ball. Of course, a swing without intention does not count, so don’t worry!

Lost ball: If the ball is lost, a penalty of one stroke is added.

A lost ball is a ball that is lost after it has been hit. If you start looking for your ball and don’t find it after five minutes, you will be penalized one additional stroke.

If you are playing golf for fun, however, you may be told that you can drop the ball nearby and hit it, instead of following the official rules. In such a case, take their word for it and be sure to tell them your score with one extra stroke.

Having an apple watch Golf Score Counter will definitely help you… any time!

ios_link

Comments

Copied title and URL